Louis Nirenberg, Abel Prize laureate, dies at 94

Nirenberg was the Abel Prize recipient together with John F. Nash Jr. in 2015 and received the prize "for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis."

Louis Nirenberg. Photo: © Peter Badge/Typos1 Louis Nirenberg. Photo: © Peter Badge/Typos1

Louis Nirenberg has had one of the longest, most feted– and most sociable – careers in mathematics. In more than half a century of research, he has transformed the field of partial differential equations, while his generosity,  and modest charm have made him an inspirational figure to his many collaborators, students and colleagues.

Louis Nirenberg was born in Hamilton, Canada, in 1925 and grew up in Montreal, where his father was a Hebrew teacher. His first interest in mathematics came from his Hebrew tutor, who introduced him to mathematical puzzles.

- His legacy in mathematics will last forever. His passing is a great loss, and we extend our deepest condolences to his family and friends. Louis Nirenberg is considered one of the most outstanding mathematicians of the 20th century, says president of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Hans Petter Graver.

Nirenberg has gathered a significant number of prestigious accolades. He won the American Mathematical Society’s Bôcher Memorial Prize in 1959. In 1969, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He won the inaugural Crafoord Prize in 1982. He received the Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement from the American Mathematical Society in 1994, and he received the National Medal of Science in 1995. In 2010, he was awarded the first Chern Medal for lifetime achievement by the International Mathematical Union and the Chern Medal Foundation. He was a member of the American Mathematical Society.

John Nash Jr. og Louis Nirenberg receives The Abel Prize for 2015 by His Majesty King Harald at the University Aula. photo: ScanpixJohn Nash Jr. og Louis Nirenberg receives The Abel Prize for 2015 by His Majesty King Harald at the University Aula. photo: Scanpix

The Abel Prize is increased by 1.5 million NOK

The board of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has decided to increase the prize amount for the Abel Prize from 6 to 7.5 million NOK.

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Abel Prize celebrations in Oslo

Karen Uhlenbeck received the Abel Prize from H.M. King Harald V

His Majesty King Harald V presented the 2019 Abel Prize to Karen Uhlenbeck at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 21st of May. Uhlenbeck is "Professor Emerita of Mathematics and Sid W. Richardson Regents Chair at the University of Texas at Austin" and "Visitor in the School of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study".

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Abel lectures at the University of Oslo

The lectures will be streamed

Karen Uhlenbeck gave her Abel Prize lecture on the 22nd of May at the University of Oslo. Chuu-LianTerng and Robert Bryant gave lectures related to Uhlenbeck's work. The popular science lecture was given by stand-up mathematician Matt Parker.

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Karen Uhlenbeck first woman to win the Abel Prize

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2019 to Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Texas at Austin, USA “for her pioneering achievements in geometric partial differential equations, gauge theory and integrable systems, and for the fundamental impact of her work on analysis, geometry and mathematical physics.”

His Majesty King Harald V will present the Abel Prize to the laureate at the award ceremony in Oslo on the 21st of May.

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Congratulations to Karen Uhlenbeck from University of Texas at Austin

"At the University of Texas at Austin and the Department of Mathematics, we are delighted and tremendously proud of Karen Uhlenbeck, recipient of the 2019 Abel Prize" - Thomas Chen, Chair of the University of Texas at Austin Math Department

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The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
Drammensveien 78
N-0271 Oslo, Norway
Telephone: + 47 22 84 15 00
Fax: + 47 22 12 10 99
E-mail: abelprisen@dnva.no
Web editor: Anne-Marie Astad
Design and technical solutions: Ravn Webveveriet AS