Hungarian-American Endre Szemerédi named Abel Prize winner

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2012 to Endre Szemerédi, Alfréd Rényi Institute of Mathematics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest and Department of Computer Science, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, USA. He receives the Abel Prize  “for his fundamental contributions to discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science, and in recognition of the profound and lasting impact of these contributions on additive number theory and ergodic theory”, to quote the Abel committee. 

The Abel Prize Laureate 2012 Endre SzemerédiThe Abel Prize Laureate 2012 Endre Szemerédi

Discrete mathematics is the study of structures such as graphs, sequences, permutations, and geometric configurations. The mathematics of such structures forms the foundation of theoretical computer science and information theory. Szemerédi was one of the first to realize the importance of theoretical computer science. He has also made deep, important, and influential contributions to many other branches of mathematics and has published over 200 scientific articles.

The President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Nils Christian Stenseth, announced the winner of the 2012 Abel Prize at the Academy in Oslo today, 21 March. Endre Szemerédi will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald at an award ceremony in Oslo on 22 May. The Abel Prize recognizes contributions of extraordinary depth and influence to the mathematical sciences and has been awarded annually since 2003. It carries a cash award of NOK 6,000,000 (close to EUR 800,000 or USD 1 million).

Enormously influential
Endre Szemerédi is described as a mathematician with exceptional research power and his influence on today’s mathematics is enormous. Yet as a mathematician, Szemerédi started out late. He attended medical school for a year, and worked in a factory before he switched over to mathematics. His extraordinary talent was discovered when he was a young student in Budapest by his mentor Paul Erdös. Szemerédi lived up to his mentor’s great expectations by proving several fundamental theorems of tremendous importance. Many of his results have generated research for the future and have laid the foundations for new directions in mathematics.

Many of his discoveries carry his name. One of the most important is Szemerédi's Theorem, which shows that in any set of integers with positive density, there are arbitrarily long arithmetic progressions. Szemerédi’s proof was a masterpiece of combinatorial reasoning, and was immediately recognized to be of exceptional depth and importance. A key step in the proof, now known as the Szemerédi Regularity Lemma, is a structural classification of large graphs.

“An Irregular Mind”
In 2010, on the occasion of Szemerédi’s 70th birthday, the Alfréd Rényi Institute of Mathematics and the János Bolyai Mathematical Society organized a conference in Budapest to celebrate his achievements. In the book, An Irregular Mind, published prior to the conference, it is stated that “Szemerédi has an ‘irregular mind’; his brain is wired differently than for most mathematicians. Many of us admire his unique way of thinking, his extraordinary vision.”

The Abel Committee notes, “Szemerédi's approach to mathematics exemplifies the strong Hungarian problem-solving tradition. Yet, the theoretical impact of his work has been a game-changer.”

Awards and honours
Endre Szemerédi has received many awards and honours for his contributions to mathematics and computer science. In 2008 he was awarded the Leroy P. Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research by the American Mathematical Society. The same year Endre Szemerédi received the Rolf Schock Prize in Mathematics from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

Endre Szemerédi is a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and of the US National Academy of Sciences.

The Abel Prize 10 years
The prize is awarded by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. The choice of the Abel Laureate is based on the recommendation of the Abel Committee, which consists of five internationally recognized mathematicians. The Abel Prize was awarded for the first time in 2003. The Abel Prize and associated events are funded by the Norwegian Government.

Yves Meyer receives the Abel Prize

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2017 to Yves Meyer (77) of the École normale supérieure Paris-Saclay, France “for his pivotal role in the development of the mathematical theory of wavelets”. The President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Ole M. Sejersted, announced the winner of the 2017 Abel Prize at the Academy in Oslo today, 21 March.

Yves Meyer was the visionary leader in the modern development of this theory, at the intersection of mathematics, information technology and computational science. 

Wavelet analysis has been applied in a wide variety of arenas as diverse as applied and computational harmonic analysis, data compression, noise reduction, medical imaging, archiving, digital cinema, deconvolution of the Hubble space telescope images, and the recent LIGO detection of gravitational waves created by the collision of two black holes.

Yves Meyer will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald V at an award ceremony in Oslo on 23 May.

The Abel Prize recognizes contributions of extraordinary depth and influence to the mathematical sciences and has been awarded annually since 2003. It carries a cash award of 6 million NOK (about 675,000 Euro or 715,000 USD). 

(21.03.2017) More

Congratulations from AMS President

"On behalf of the American Mathematical Society, it is my great pleasure to congratulate Professor Yves Meyer, recipient of the 2017 Abel Prize.  Professor Meyer has been a visionary in a broad range of fields, including number theory and differential equations.  His fundamental work in the theory of wavelets has transformed the world of signal processing and has led to a myriad of practical applications."  -- AMS President Kenneth A. Ribet (University of California, Berkeley)
Photo: Jim Brook

 

(02.04.2017) More

Abel Prize announcement March 21

Popular science presentation by Terence Tao

The President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Ole M. Sejersted, will announce the winner of the Abel Prize for 2017 at the Academy on the 21st of March. The Academy's choice of laureate is based on the Abel Committee's recommendation. The chair of the Abel Committee, John Rognes, will give the reasons for the awarding of the prize. The world famous mathematician Terence Tao will give the popular science presentation of the prize winner's work.

(09.03.2017) More

"Abel in Barcelona" with lecture by Louis Nirenberg

Institut d'Estudis Catalans will host the Abel in Barcelona-event on Monday the 16th of January. In connection with the final meeting of the Abel committee, whose task it is to select the Abel Prize Laureate for 2017, there will be an afternoon of lectures aimed at a broad mathematical audience. Louis Nirenberg, who shared the Abel Prize 2015 with John Nash, will give the first lecture. There will also be lectures by two of the Abel committee members, Luigi Ambrosio and Ben Green.

(04.01.2017) More

Sir Andrew J. Wiles received the Abel Prize from H.R.H. Crown Prince Haakon

Andrew Wiles received the 2016 Abel Prize from Norway's Crown Prince Haakon at an award ceremony in Oslo today, on 24 May. He receives the prize "for his stunning proof of Fermat's Last Theorem by way of the modularity conjecture for semistable elliptic curves, opening a new era in number theory", to quote the Abel Committee. The Abel Prize carries a cash award of 6 million NOK (about EUR 700,000 or USD 750,000) and has been awarded annually since 2003 by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

(24.05.2016) More
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Telephone: + 47 22 84 15 00
Fax: + 47 22 12 10 99
E-mail: abelprisen@dnva.no
Web editor: Anne-Marie Astad
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