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Swedish mathematician receives the Abel Prize

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has decided to award the 2006 Abel Prize to Lennart Carleson, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. This was announced by the president of the Norwegian Academy, Ole Didrik Lærum, in Oslo 23 March. Carleson receives the Abel Prize “for his profound and seminal contributions to harmonic analysis and the theory of smooth dynamical systems”, says Erling Størmer, the chairman of the international Abel Committee. Her Majesty Queen Sonja will present the Abel Prize to Lennart Carleson at an award ceremony in Oslo 23 May.
Erling Størmer describes Carlson as an innovative problem solver. The Abel Committee says: “Carleson is always far ahead of the crowd. He concentrates on only the most difficult and deep problems. Once these are solved, he lets others invade the kingdom he has discovered, and he moves on to even wilder and more remote domains of Science.” Carleson has solved many very difficult open problems. In the Committee's opinion, the most impressive of these concerns Fourier series. His name is also associated with the solution of the famous corona problem. Carleson has made many essential contributions to several fields within mathematics. Carleson’s work has also been influential in the sense that other mathematicians have been able to build on the foundation he has created. The Abel Committee says in its citation: “Carleson's work has forever altered our view of analysis. Not only did he prove extremely hard theorems, but the methods he introduced to prove them have turned out to be as important as the theorems themselves. His unique style is characterized by geometric insight combined with amazing control of the branching complexities of the proofs.” The impact of the ideas and actions of Lennart Carleson is not restricted to his mathematical work. Carleson has played an important role in popularising mathematics in Sweden, and he has always been especially interested in school mathematics. Lennart Carleson has also held many important posts. In the years 1968-1984, he was director of Institut Mittag-Leffler outside Stockholm, building it up from a rather dormant existence into one of the most popular and active mathematical research institutes in the world. In the years 1978-1982, he was president of the International Mathematical Union and was, among other things, one of the key persons involved in the establishment of the Nevalinna Prize, which goes to young researchers in the field of theoretical computer science. – Lennart Carleson is an exceptional scientist with a broad vision of mathematics and the subject's role in the world, says Erling Størmer.

Links

Marcus du Sautoy's presentation of Lennart Carleson

Marcus du Sautoy's presentation of Lennart Carleson

More about the Prize Winner

More about the Prize Winner

Sir Andrew J. Wiles receives the Abel Prize

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The President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Ole M. Sejersted, announced the winner of the 2016 Abel Prize at the Academy in Oslo today, 15 March. Andrew J. Wiles will receive the Abel Prize from H.R.H. Crown Prince Haakon at an award ceremony in Oslo on 24 May.

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Martin Bridson, Head of the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, about Sir Andrew Wiles

“No individual exemplifies the relentless pursuit of mathematical understanding in the service of mankind better than Sir Andrew Wiles. His dedication to solving problems that have defied mankind for centuries, and the stunning beauty of his solutions to these problems, provide a beacon to inspire and sustain everyone who wrestles with the fundamental challenges of mathematics and the world around us. His work will inspire mathematicians and scientists for centuries to come. We are immensely proud to have Andrew as a colleague at the Mathematical Institute in Oxford.

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Abel Prize announcement March 15

Obligatorisk!

The President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, Ole M. Sejersted, (picture) will announce the winner of the Abel Prize for 2016 at the Academy on the 15th of March. The Academy's choice of laureate is based on the recommendation of the Abel Committee. The chair of the Abel Committee, John Rognes, will give the reasons for the awarding of the prize. Alex Bellos will then give a popular science presentation of the prize winner's work.

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The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
Drammensveien 78
N-0271 Oslo, Norway
Telephone: + 47 22 84 15 00
Fax: + 47 22 12 10 99
E-mail: abelprisen@dnva.no
Web editor: Anne-Marie Astad
Design and technical solutions: Ravn Webveveriet AS